The Sound of Music - Dallas Theater Center
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The Sound of Music
Music by Richard Rodgers || Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein
Book by Howard Lindsay & Russel Crouse
Suggested by “The Trapp Family Singers” by Maria Augusta Trapp
Directed by Kevin Moriarty

March 26 – April 24, 2022  ||  Wyly Theatre

Effective March 9, 2022

Dallas Theater Center will require audience members ages 5 and up to provide proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of their ticketed show date. View our COVID-19 Guest Policy here. 

A country under attack. A family paralyzed by loss. And a woman who is afraid to love. Dallas Theater Center boldly reexamines one of the most exhilarating musical theater classics ever written.  Winner of five Tony Awards®, including Best Musical, The Sound of Music was the final collaboration between Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. From its opening in 1959, it immediately became the world’s most beloved musical on both stage and film. The inspirational story follows a young postulate who is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of an imperious naval captain, bringing joy and music to the household. But as the forces of Nazism take hold of Austria, Maria and the entire von Trapp family must make a moral decision. Join us on this vibrant journey of love and faith, and once again let your heart thrill to The Sound of Music.

 

 

 

The Sound of Music
Music by Richard Rodgers || Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein
Book by Howard Lindsay & Russel Crouse
Suggested by “The Trapp Family Singers” by Maria Augusta Trapp
Directed by Kevin Moriarty

March 26 – April 24, 2022  ||  Wyly Theatre

Effective March 9, 2022

Dallas Theater Center will require audience members ages 5 and up to provide proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of their ticketed show date. View our COVID-19 Guest Policy here. 

A country under attack. A family paralyzed by loss. And a woman who is afraid to love. Dallas Theater Center boldly reexamines one of the most exhilarating musical theater classics ever written.  Winner of five Tony Awards®, including Best Musical, The Sound of Music was the final collaboration between Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. From its opening in 1959, it immediately became the world’s most beloved musical on both stage and film. The inspirational story follows a young postulate who is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of an imperious naval captain, bringing joy and music to the household. But as the forces of Nazism take hold of Austria, Maria and the entire von Trapp family must make a moral decision. Join us on this vibrant journey of love and faith, and once again let your heart thrill to The Sound of Music.

 

 

 

Cast
Patrick Bilbow
Kurt
Essence Chicoine
Sister Berthe, Party Guest
Sabrina Daly
Understudy for Louisa, Brigitta
Sofia Desena
Gretl
Avanti Dey
Sister Sophia
Mckenzy Dodson
Louisa
Jaelle Duff
Understudy for Gretl, Marta
Alli Franken
Liesl, Baroness Elberfeld, Frau Schmidt, Frau Zeller, Understudy for New Postulant
Sarah Gay
Elsa Schraeder, Nun
Felix Gooden
Understudy for Friedrich, Kurt
Arianna Hardaway
New Postulant, Nun, Understudy for Maria
Wyatt Hartz
Friedrich
Bob Hess
Franz, Understudy for Max Detweiler
Lance Jewett
Rolf Gruber
Sophie Rose Kirkham
Brigitta
Christina Austin Lopez
Leisl
Brian Mathis
Herr Zeller, Lieutenant
Paolo Montalban
Captain Georg von Trapp
Sally Nystuen Vahle
Frau Schmidt, Nun
Alex Organ
Max Detweiler
Kenzie Rees
Marta
Kathryn Taylor Rose
Frau Zeller, Nun, Understudy for Elsa Schraeder, Sister Margarita, Sister Sophia, Sister Berthe
Molly Searcy
Baroness Elberfeld, Nun
Cara Serber
Sister Margaretta, Party Guest, Understudy for Mother Abbess
Oscar Seung
Baron Elberfeld, Admiral von Schreiber Understudy for Captain Georg von Trapp
Tiffany Solano
Maria Rainer
Angela Turner Wilson
Mother Abbess
Zachary J. Willis
Understudy for Admiral von Schreiber, Baron Elberfeld, Franz, Herr Zeller, Rolf Gruber

It’s the best-known movie musical of all time.  It’s hard to imagine a fan of musicals who hasn’t seen the opening shot, the camera swirling in over the Alpine meadows to come down over Julie Andrews, twirling in her apron.

But many may not know that the stage musical was commissioned by and created for its original Broadway star: not Julie Andrews, but theater legend Mary Martin (who also created the leading roles in South Pacific and Peter Pan). Opening on Broadway in 1959, The Sound of Music was the last musical that composer Richard Rodgers and lyrcist Oscar Hammerstein II wrote together. Hammerstein was diagnosed with stomach cancer while writing the show and died less than a year after it opened.

Despite having transformed the style and content of Broadway musicals through their bold innovations with Oklahoma!, Carousel, and The King and I, the duo’s final show received mixed reviews when it opened. Some critics found it to be too sentimental and out of step with the times. In the same theater season, praise was heaped on the hard-edged cynicism of Gypsy, whose lyrics were written by Hammerstein’s protégé, Stephen Sondheim, while the Pulitzer Prize for Drama went to the satirical political musical, Fiorerllo!

And yet, audiences instantly fell in love with the show. The musical ran for three and a half years on Broadway and nearly twice as long in London, where it became the longest running musical in British history. The original Broadway cast recording occupied the number one position on the Billboard charts for four months. When the film was released, the soundtrack recording was on the Billboard charts for four and a half years. The songs have become part of the fabric of American musical life (one example: Ariana Grande’s song, “7 Rings,” which is based on the melody of “My Favorite Things,” spent eight weeks at number one in 2019).

Despite the ubiquity of the film and the songs, many people don’t know that the play and the movie differ. Songs appear in different contexts and characters have added dimension.

We hope that our production will inspire audiences to experience The Sound of Music with fresh eyes and an open heart. The dialogue and music are the same as in the original stage production, but our cast and creative team have attempted to shed any preconceived notions of how the design should look or how the characters should be portrayed. Instead of reproducing an old movie on stage, we are approaching the material as if it were a brand-new play.

The Sound of Music illuminates the choices people make when confronted with their deepest fears. Will you open yourself to intimacy with someone you love when you are afraid of your desire? Will you allow yourself to be vulnerable with another person when you have experienced the pain of loss? Will you be an upstander when your fellow citizens capitulate to a genocidal dictator? Will you give up your home and risk your family’s safety rather than be complicit with those who espouse evil? Will you follow God’s calling when racked with fear?

At its simplest, The Sound of Music is a story about romantic and familial love. But Hammerstein understood that loving someone, and accepting love in return, is rarely simple. Whether comically in Oklahoma! or tragically in Carousel, the vulnerability of loving is a recurring theme in many of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musicals. When Maria enters the convent as a means of hiding from her own desire, the Mother Abbess tells her that she must leave. “What you must find is – how does God want you to spend your love.” For Maria, the widowed Captain and his grieving children, the answer is found in creating a new, blended family.

As in all of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s masterpieces, the psychologically driven personal story at the center of The Sound of Music exists within a broader context. Set in Austria in 1938, the love story plays out against the events of the Anschluss, when Hitler’s German army crossed the border into Austria, unopposed by the Austrian military. The Germans were greeted with great enthusiasm and Austria was annexed. Widespread antisemitic actions and political violence followed. Anyone opposing the Nazi rule was subject to arrest, torture and death. Jews were attacked, their businesse seized, their posessions looted. Ultimately, more than 6 million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust. One year after the Anschluss, much of the world was plunged into World War II.

In 1959, Broadway audiences would have understood exactly what was at stake for the characters. The people watching the play had fought in and lived through World War II. They had seen the unimaginable horror of the Holocaust. They had come face to face with the anti-semitism, racial hatred and violence of the Nazis. It didn’t need to be overtly depicted on the stage. They would have palpably understood the terrible consequences that would follow when Elsa sings to the Captain that resisting the Germans is useless:

There’s no way to stop it,
No you can’t stop it even if you try…
You’re a fool if you worry
Over anything but little Number One!

The original audiences for The Sound of Music would have enjoyed the many happy moments of the musical even while simultaneously seeing images of destruction in their memories. Our production attempts to make that experience visually manifest on stage for a contemporary audience. We have created a design in which two elements can coexist in the same theatrical space: an intimate story of personal discovery played out against the very real destruction that would soon be wrought by the Nazis.

In The Sound of Music, religious faith helps the characters navigate through moments of crisis. Hammerstein’s lyrics sing with a love of music and nature, both of which he links to spirituality and healing. The first lyrics he wrote for The Sound of Music express Maria’s faith with simplicity and grace:

I go to the hills
When my heart is lonely,
I know I will hear
What I’ve heard before.
My heart will be blessed
With the sound of music
And I’ll sing once more.

Similarly, for Hammerstein the pursuit of faith and personal understanding are connected to the innate moral responsibility to stand up for social justice. In the first act, the Mother Abbess sings “Climb Every Mountain” to Maria to inspire her to accept her romantic desire for the Captain and her maternal love for his children. At the play’s conclusion, the song returns, but now its meaning has expanded to become a call to action for each person to stand up for righteousness in the broader world.

These ideas about the deep rewards of family, the power of faith, and the solemn obligation of each individual to make the world more just for all had occupied Hammerstein for most of his life. In his final months, surrounded by his family on his farm in Pennsylvania, he wrote the lyrics to “Edelweiss.” This is the culmination of his final song:

…bless my homeland forever.

Location & Seating

Presenting Sponsor

JENNIFER AND PETER ALTABEF

Executive Producing Partner

Associate Producing Partner

Assistant Producing Sponsor

#TheSoundOfMusicDTC
COMMENTS
2 COMMENT

brittani wilkins
Hi Thomas, The Sound of Music auditions can be viewed here: https://www.dallastheatercenter.org/auditions-play-submissions/

Thomas
Hello there, I was just wondering if your auditions for Sound Of Music are open or closed. And if they are open, when are they? Thank you, Thomas

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